An Approach to the “X wa A ga B” Sentence Pattern / 「XはAがB」の文型のとらえかた試論

An image to explain the “X wa A ga B” sentence pattern
Zoo wa hana ga nagai desu. (象は鼻が長いです。/The elephant has a long trunk.) is one of the typical sentences of this sentence pattern.
和文は英文の後に続きます。/Japanese translation is on the bottom of this page.
Contents

1. What is the sentence pattern “X wa A ga B”?

2. Examples of “X wa A ga B.”

3. Imagine a “Framed Painting” on the examples

  • Ex. 1: Zoo wa hana ga nagai desu. (Elephants have long trunks.)
  • Ex. 2: Watashi wa chocoleeto ga suki desu. (I like chocolate.)
  • Ex. 3: Watashi wa atama ga itai desu. (I have a headache.)
  • Ex. 4: Watashi wa booshi ga arimasu. (I have a hat.)
  • Ex. 5: “Oya no oshie to nasubi no hana wa sen ni hitotsu mo ada ga nai” (“Parents’ Teachings and Eggplant Flowers Never Fail to be Valuable.”)

4. FAQ on the “A wa X ga Y” Sentence Pattern 

************************

1. What is the “X wa A ga B” sentence pattern?

In our prior post, “Parents’ Teachings and Eggplant Flowers Never Fail to be Valuable”, we mentioned the “X wa A ga B” sentence pattern. It’s actually a very popular sentence pattern in everyday conversation, so we’d like to discuss it in this post.

Have you seen it in one or more of the following examples?

2. The examples of the “X wa A ga B” sentence pattern

  • Ex. 1: Zoo wa hana ga nagai desu. (Elephants have long trunks.)
  • Ex. 2: Watashi wa chokoleeto ga suki desu. (I like chocolate.)
  • Ex. 3: Watashi wa atama ga itai desu. (I have a headache.)
  • Ex. 4: Watashi wa booshi ga arimasu.x (I have a hat.)
  • Ex. 5: “Oya no oshie to nasubi no hana wa sen ni hitotsu mo ada ga nai” (“Parents’ Teachings and Eggplant Flowers Never Fail to be Valuable.”)

In this sentence pattern, the existence of two subject markers “wa” and “ga” in one sentence sometimes makes students wonder. How should we understand the pattern? Or how should we “feel” what they mean?

3. Imagine a “Framed Painting” on the Examples

An image of a framed picture, an analogy to explain the “X wa A ga B" sentence pattern.

Suppose we would like to say that in this picture, the color of her dress is beautiful. 
The title of this painting is “A Knitting Woman (Amimono o shite-iru josei)”. So, we begin our sentence with “Amimono o shiteiru josei wa…” to present the entire picture. Then we direct a spotlight on the dress and describe it. In this case, “…doresu no iro ga suteki desu (the color of her dress is beautiful.)” 
この女性(じょせい)のドレスの色(いろ)が美(うつく)しいと言(い)いたいとします。
この絵(え)の題(だい)は「編(あ)み物(もの)をしている女性(じょせい)」です。それで、「編(あ)み物(もの)をしている女性(じょせい)は」と、絵(え)の全体(ぜんたい)を表()すことから文(ぶん)を始(はじ)めます。次にスポットライトをドレスに当て、説明します。「ドレスの色(いろ)が素敵(すてき)です。」

We would like to offer an analogy to “a framed painting”.

In other words, when we encounter this sentence pattern, we analyze it as if we were looking at a painting in a frame with a title, such as one we see in a museum. It works as follows: 

Generally, when we hear a word (or words) followed by “wa”, we recognize it as the subject, topic, the context or the background information that the speaker wants to share with us. Then the next part usually explains what the subject does or how it is.  

However, if we hear the second word followed by “ga” after the “wa” block, we immediately switch our mode to that for the “X wa A ga B” sentence pattern. We need to get the meaning accordingly.

With the “X wa A ga B” sentence pattern, first, the word followed by “wa” is the resemblance of the title of a painting. 

Next, the following part, “A ga B”, resembles one part of the picture receiving a spotlight. In this part, “A” is the actual subject of the sentence and “B” is its predicate. In other words, “B” is directly connected to “A” grammatically and semantically, and explains the state of “A”. 

Finally, the spotlighted picture that A and B present is still a part or a constituent of the bigger picture “X”.

Let’s look at the examples again with the framing-picture image.

Ex. 1: Zoo wa hana ga nagai desu. (Elephants have long trunks.)

To talk about one part of something, we frequently use this sentence structure. 

“Zoo” is followed by “wa” so it is the “title of the painting”. You now know that we are going to tell about the elephant. 

Actually we can say many things about an elephant. It is as if you could draw pictures of many parts of an elephant under the title “zoo”. For example, after “Zoo wa… (as for the elephant)”, you can continue: 

  • …hana ga nagai desu. (literally, the nose is long = The elephant has a long trunk.) 
  • …mimi ga ookii desu. (lit., the ears are big = The elephant has big ears.) 
  • …ashi ga hutoi desu. (lit., the legs are thick = The elephant has thick legs). 
  • …atama ga ii desu. (lit., the head is good = The elephant is smart.) or 
  • …zooge ga toremasu. (lit., you can get ivory = You can get ivory from them.)

Ex. 2: “Watashi wa chokoreeto ga suki desu.” (I like chocolate.)

When we say we like or love something, we frequently use the “X wa A ga B” sentence pattern. 

“Watashi” is the “title” since it’s followed by “wa”. 

“Chocoreeto ga suki desu.” means “chocolate is like-able/attractive.” 

Therefore, literally translated, it is “As for me, chocolate is like-able/attractive.” This is how the Japanese say “I like/love chocolate”.

Ex. 3: “Watashi wa atama ga itai desu.” (I have a headache.)

We also use the “X wa A ga B” sentence pattern when we talk about the condition of our body parts. 

“Watashi” is the “title” since it’s followed by “wa”. 

“Atama ga itai desu.” means “the head is painful.”

Literally translated, it is “As for me, the head is painful.” This is how we say “I have a headache.”

Note: “Suki” (Ex. 2), “itai” (Ex. 3) and some other adjectives for feelings and emotions directly express those of the speaker. Therefore, if you hear someone say “Atama ga itai…” “Chokoreeto ga suki desu.” without the word with “wa”, it’s about the speaker. Also, if someone says, with a rising intonation,“Chokoreeto ga suki?” “Atama ga itai?”, he/she is asking about YOU.

Ex. 4: “Watashi wa booshi ga arimasu.” (I have a hat.)

In Japanese, the “X wa A ga B” sentence pattern is also used to express possession.

“Watashi” is the “title of the painting” since it’s followed by “wa”. 

“Booshi ga arimasu” means “a hat exists.”

Literally translated, it is “As for me, there is a hat.” This is how the Japanese say “I have a hat.”

Note: In Japanese, whenever understandable from the context, we may omit the subject from a sentence. If you don’t hear the subject, it is usually about the speaker or the same as the most recently mentioned subject. For example, “Booshi ga arimasu.” may also be interpreted as “I have a hat.”

Ex. 5: “Oya no oshie to nasubi no hana wa sen ni hitotsu mo ada ga nai” (“Parents’ Teachings and Eggplant Flowers Never Fail to be Valuable.”)

This is a longer sentence but we will work on it since we explained this proverb in another post.

Here, too, you can say many things about her. We will show you some examples with verbs and a noun for “B”:

“Oya no oshie to nasubi no hana” is the “title” since it is followed by “wa”.

Then comes the statement “ada ga nai” (waste doesn’t exist).

In English, you could say “Speaking of parents’ teachings and eggplant flowers, there is no waste at all”, meaning each word of our parents has a great value.

By the way, “Sen-ni hitotsu mo” (not one in a thousand) emphasizes “nai” (doesn’t exist).

4. FAQ on the “A wa X ga Y” Sentence Pattern 

In our next post, we will discuss two of the most popular questions on the “A wa X ga Y” sentence pattern: FAQ on the “X wa A ga B” Sentence Pattern.

[End of the post]

Related Posts

=>Return to Recent Posts/「新着記事」へ戻る

=>Return to Home/「ホーム」へ戻る

[End of the English post]

*************************************

「XはAがB」の文型ぶんけいのとらえかたろん

もく 

1. 「X は A が B」の文型ぶんけいとは?

2. 「X は A が B」 の例文れいぶん

3. 「がくはいった」のイメージと例文れいぶん

  • れい1: ぞうはなながいです。
  • れい2: わたしはチョコレートがきです。
  • れい3: わたしあたまいたいです。
  • れい4: わたしぼうがあります。
  • れい5: 「おやおしえとなすびのはなせんにひとつもがない」

4. 「X は A が B」の文型ぶんけいについて、よくある質問しつもん

************************

1.「XはAがB」の文型ぶんけいとは?

ぜん投稿とうこうおやおしえとなすびのはなせんにひとつもがない」で、「XはAがB」の文型ぶんけいについてふれました。これはにちじょう生活せいかつでとてもよく使つかわれるので、ここではこの文型ぶんけいについてかんがえたいとおもいます。

つぎ例文れいぶんのどれかをたことがありませんか。

2.「XはAがB」文型ぶんけい例文れいぶん

  • れい1: ぞうはなながいです。
  • れい2: わたしはチョコレートがきです。
  • れい3: わたしあたまいたいです。
  • れい4: わたしぼうがあります。
  • れい5: 「おやおしえとなすびのはなせんにひとつもがない」

この文型ぶんけいには、ぶんちゅうしゅしめす「は」と「が」がりょうほうあるので、どういうことだろうというこえをときどききます。この文型ぶんけいをどうかいすればよいでしょうか。あるいは、をどう「かんったら」いいでしょうか。

3.がくはいった」のイメージと例文れいぶん

この文型ぶんけいを「がく」のようなものとかんがえてみます。

つまり、このようなぶんったら、だいのついたがくはいった、じゅつかんにあるような想像そうぞうして分析ぶんせきするのです。

まず、一般いっぱんに、「は」をしたがえたこといたら、それがはなきょうゆうしたいしゅだいぶんみゃくあるいは背景はいけいだとかんがえます。つうはこのあとに、そのしゅがすることや、しゅじょうたい説明せつめいするぶんます。

しかし、この「は」のついたことあとに「が」のついたことたら、すぐ「XはAがB」の文型ぶんけいモードにえ、その文型ぶんけいとしてかいするのです。

この文型ぶんけいでは、まず、「は」のついた最初さいしょことは「だいのついたがく」にています。

そのあとにる「AがB」のぶんは、なかいちぶんにスポットライトがたっているかんじです。このぶんでは、Aが実際じっさいしゅで、Bがそのじゅつです。BはAに文法的ぶんぽうてきにもにもちょっけつして、Aのじょうたい説明せつめいしています。

そして、このスポットライトのたったところは、やはりおおきなであるXのいちぶん、または構成要こうせいようなのです。

れいをもういちて、額縁がくぶちのイメージで分析ぶんせきしてみましょう。

れい1: ぞうはなながいです。

なにかのいちぶんについてはなとき、「XはAがB」の文型ぶんけいをよく使つかいます。

このあい、「ぞう」は「は」のまえにあるので、「題名だいめい」になります。これで、わたしたちがぞうはなしをしようとしていることがわかります。

わたしたちは、ぞうについていろいろなことをべることができます。「ぞう」というだいのもとで、ぞうのさまざまなぶんにスポットライトをてる感覚かんかくです。たとえば、「ぞうは……」のあとつぎのようにいろいろとぶんつづけることができます。

  • ……はなながいです。
  • ……みみおおきいです。
  • ……あしふといです。
  • ……あたまがいいです。
  • ……ぞうれます。

れい2: わたしはチョコレートがきです。

きなもののことをとき、よく「XはAがB」の文型ぶんけい使つかいます。

わたし」のあとに「は」がついているので、これが「だい」です。

「チョコレートがきです」は、どおりには「チョコレートはこのましい・ける」というです。

ですから、ちょくやくすれば「わたしについてえば、チョコレートはこのましいものだ・ける」ですが、これが本人ほんじんの、I like chocolate. のかたです。

れい3: わたしあたまいたいです。

わたしたちはからだぶんじょうたいときも、「XはAがB」の文型ぶんけい使つかいます。

わたし」のあとに「は」がついていますから、これが「だい」です。

ちょくやくすれば「わたしについてえば、あたまいたい」となります。

ちゅう: れい2の「き」、れい3の「いたい」そのかんじやかんじょうについての形容けいようは、はなのそれをちょくせつあらわすことがあります。そのため、「あたまいたい」「チョコレートがきです」などと「は」をともなことのないぶんいたあい、それは本人ほんにんのことです。また、だれかががり調ぢょうで「チョコレートがき?」「あたまいたい?」などとったら、そのひとはあなたのちやかんじをたずねていることになります。

れい4: わたしぼうがあります。

ほんでは、所有しょゆうあらわときも、「XはAがB」の文型ぶんけい使つかいます。

わたし」のあとに「は」がついていますから、これが「だい」です。

どおりにやくすと、「わたしについてえば、ぼう存在そんざいします。」になります。I have a hat. はほんではこのようにいます。

れい5: 「おやおしえとなすびのはなせんにひとつもがない」

これはながぶんですが、ほか投稿とうこうでこのことわざをあつかったので、てみましょう。

おやおしえとなすびのはな」は「は」をしたがえているので、「だい」です。

えいでは、「おやおしえとなすびのはなについて言えば、ひとつもがない。つまり、どれにもおおきながある」ということになるでしょう。

なお、「せんにひとつも」は、「ない」をきょう調ちょうしています。

4. 「X は A が B」の文型ぶんけいについて、よくある質問しつもん

次の投稿とうこう =>FAQ on the “A wa X ga Y” Sentence Patternでは、よくある質問しつもんふたつについてかんがええます。

[和文部終わり]

関連かんれんリンク

  • 英文えいぶんまつをごさんしょうください。

=>Return to 2019 Posts / 2019年投稿記事へ戻る

=>Return to Home/「ホーム」へ戻る

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

20 − ten =